Autor
Przemysław Walasek

Przemysław Walasek, LL.M.

Partner

Read More
Autor
Przemysław Walasek

Przemysław Walasek, LL.M.

Partner

Read More

7. April 2020

COVID-19: How to save a business relationship in times of the coronavirus pandemic

  • QUICK READ

The situation which has emerged as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic has already led to a fundamental change to the reality surrounding us. It is impossible at this stage to assess the nature and extent of all the effects of the ongoing pandemic, but there is no doubt that it will impact on legal relationships, in particular including contractual relationships. Many entrepreneurs are probably already experiencing, or will shortly experience, a situation in which it will become extremely difficult or even impossible to comply with their contractual obligations. In such a case, one should consider using the measures which are already available under the current legislation. Below we set out a few practical steps which we believe each entrepreneur struggling to carry out his contractual undertakings can take:

  • Is the occurrence of force majeure stipulated in the contract? Reading and understanding the binding contracts can most certainly not be overestimated. It is possible that the agreement to which one is a party includes the so-called force majeure clause (vis maior, force majeure), which has become a “boilerplate” provision which is commonly implemented in various types of agreements. It usually contains a definition of an event of force majeure (e.g. as an extraordinary, external event which is difficult to predict and the effects of which cannot be prevented even with maximum care) supplemented by an open or closed catalogue of specific states and situations which, in the opinion of the parties to the contract, should be included within the definition. The essence of the force majeure clause is a reservation that a party is not responsible for the non-performance or improper performance of the contract caused by force majeure or which otherwise limits its contractual liability in this respect.
  • Epidemics as an event of force majeure. The inclusion of the force majeure clause in the agreement is definitely good news. In the next step, one should consider whether the disruption which arises as a result of COVID-19 will meet the definition of force majeure in the agreement. One can assume with a great deal of certainty that this will be the case, although it is the wording of the provision under consideration which is decisive. If it explicitly mentions an epidemic as one example of force majeure, then the situation seems to be fairly straightforward. According to Article 2(9) of the Act of 5 December 2008 on Prevention and Control of Infections and Infectious Diseases, an epidemic is understood as the occurrence of infections or contagious diseases in a given area in a number clearly greater than in the previous period, or the occurrence of infections or contagious diseases not yet observed. While in the period from 14th to 19 March 2020, i.e. after the official announcement of the danger of state epidemic, one could possibly consider whether we were already dealing with an epidemic, or "only" with the risk of its occurrence, the official announcement of the state of epidemic which started on 20th March 2020 removes all doubt in this respect. The state of the epidemic has a number of far-reaching, direct legal consequences, but at the same time it significantly strengthens the legitimacy to invoke the force majeure clause stipulated in the agreement.
  • Other cases of force majeure. However, the situation is definitely more complex, the spread of COVID-19 has triggered a number of reactions and processes the development of which and, above all, the effects are difficult to predict at this stage. Many of them can potentially be classified as force majeure, which also applies to the actions of public authorities and the measures which have already been taken to combat the threat of epidemic. This is primarily the Regulation of the Minister Council of 31st March 2020 on establishing certain restrictions, orders and prohibitions in view of an outbreak of an epidemic. The regulation provides for a number of restrictions which directly affect the conduct of business activities, including, inter alia, a restriction or total ban on certain types of activities (including the organisation of events, activities related to the consumption and serving of beverages, retail trade of certain goods in large commercial centres or activities related to sport, entertainment and recreation), a general restriction of movement within the territory of Republic of Poland (save for certain exceptions), an obligation to quarantine individuals who have crossed the Polish border or a restriction or prohibition on trading of and using certain items (e.g. prohibition on exporting or disposing of respirators and cardiac monitors outside the territory of the Republic of Poland). Although the classification of the governmental state activities (the so-called "imperium") regarding force majeure raises some controversy in the legal doctrine, it should be acknowledged that the freedom of the parties in shaping the contractual relationship goes far enough for such official restrictions to be included within the definition of force majeure determined by the parties. The wording of the contract will therefore be decisive in this respect.
  • What if there is no force majeure clause in the contract? A similar issue may also arise if the parties have provided for such a provision in the agreement, still due to its narrow scope it cannot be applied, e.g. if its wording has been reduced to an exhaustive list of specific situations which do not involve either epidemics or governmental action. Force majeure is a term used in Polish law, however, there is no general provision in the Civil Code which would provide for the limitation of contractual liability due to force majeure. In such a situation, alternative measures should be considered, initially including the so-called rebus sic stantibus clause under Article 3571 of the Civil Code, which some time ago experienced a real renaissance in popularity due to the public discussion on its potential application to bank loans denominated and indexed in Swiss francs (CHF). This provision allows for a change in the manner of performance, its amount or even termination of the contract if the performance would be associated with excessive difficulties or would threaten one of the parties with gross loss due to an extraordinary change in relationships, which the parties did not expect when concluding the contract. Similar mechanisms have been provided for by the legislator for certain specific types of contracts (e.g. an increase of the lump sum remuneration or termination of contracts for the performance of a specific task pursuant to Article 632 of the Civil Code, or reduction of the lease rent pursuant to Article 700 of the Civil Code). In this context, it is also worth noting that responsibility for proper performance is based on the principle of fault, and the debtor is obliged, in principle, to exercise due diligence. However, as appealing as the above mentioned solutions are, their value is significantly diminished by the fact that a change in the contractual relationship (or even its termination) is decided by the court, thus an effective solution to the problem of inability to perform the contract will be postponed in time, especially taking into account the current situation. Already now, unless this issue is regulated by the legislator in advance, extraordinary delays in the work of the courts should be expected.
  • What action should be taken now? Usually, the contractual provisions concerning force majeure also provide for an appropriate procedure, which starts with notifying the other party that its trading partner has been affected by a case of force majeure and that this may affect the performance of its contractual obligations. This should be done in accordance with the manner of communication agreed under the contract, but in any case, by means which adequately evidence the fulfilment of the obligation to notify. The next step may involve negotiations between the parties in good faith in order to change the contractual relationship accordingly. Finally, in the case of extended force majeure events (e.g. more than 90 days), each party may be entitled to unilaterally terminate the contract. Much depends on the circumstances of the specific matter (including, above all, the wording of the contract), but it appears that at this stage it is too early to draw any far-reaching conclusions and one should firstly wait for further developments. It is certainly advisable to communicate with the business partner and to prepare them for any possible perturbations in the performance of the contract. This applies both to contracts with an express force majeure clause and those in which the parties did not provide for such regulation. Initiating talks at an early stage of a force majeure event may limit the extent of possible damages and possibly also increase the chance to save the contractual relationship.

Jak uratować relację biznesową w czasach pandemii koronawirusa (COVID-19)?

Sytuacja powstała w związku pandemią COVID-19 już dokonała zasadniczej zmiany otaczającej nasz rzeczywistości. Nie sposób na obecnym etapie ocenić charakter i zakres wszystkich skutków trwającej pandemii, nie ulega jednak wątpliwości, że będzie ona miała przełożenie na sferę stosunków prawnych, w tym także na relacje umowne. Zapewne wielu przedsiębiorców już doświadcza lub wkrótce doświadczy sytuacji, w której wykonanie zobowiązań kontraktowych stanie się bardzo trudne lub nawet niemożliwe. Należy wówczas zastanowić się nad zastosowaniem rozwiązań już teraz dostępnych na gruncie obowiązujących przepisów prawa – poniżej przedstawiam parę praktycznych czynności, które w naszej ocenie może podjąć przedsiębiorca zmagający się z wykonaniem obowiązków umownych:

  • Czy wystąpienie siły wyższej zostało uregulowane w umowie? Czytanie zawartych umów ze zrozumieniem jest trudne do przecenienia. Niewykluczone, że w umowie, której jesteśmy stroną, zawarta została tzw. klauzula siły wyższej (vis maior, force majeure), która w praktyce obrotu handlowego stała się standardowym postanowieniem powszechnie włączanym do różnego rodzaju umów. Zazwyczaj zawiera ono definicję przypadku siły wyższej (np. jako wydarzenie nadzwyczajne, zewnętrzne, trudne do przewidzenia, którego skutkom nie można zapobiec nawet przy dołożeniu maksymalnej staranności) uzupełnioną następnie o otwarty bądź zamknięty katalog konkretnych stanów i sytuacji, które w ocenie stron umowy spełniają przesłanki definicji. Istotą klauzuli siły wyższej jest zastrzeżenie, że strona nie odpowiada za niewykonanie bądź nienależyte wykonanie umowy, które zostało spowodowane działaniem siły wyższej lub w inny sposób ogranicza jej odpowiedzialność kontraktową w tym zakresie.
  • Epidemia jako przypadek siły wyższej. Zawarcie w umowie postanowienia dotyczącego siły wyższej to zdecydowanie dobra wiadomość. W kolejnym kroku, należy się zastanowić, czy zamieszanie powstałe w związku z COVID-19 spełniać będzie przesłanki definicji siły wyższej zawartej w umowie. Z dużą dozą pewności można zakładać, że tak będzie w istocie, aczkolwiek decydujące znaczenie ma brzmienie analizowanego postanowienia. Jeśli wyraźnie wskazano w nim na epidemię jako jeden z przykładów siły wyższej, wówczas sytuacja wydaje się dość prosta. Zgodnie art. 2 punktem 9 ustawy z dnia 5 grudnia 2008 roku o zapobieganiu oraz zwalczaniu zakażeń i chorób zakaźnych przez epidemię rozumieć należy wystąpienie na danym obszarze zakażeń lub zachorowań na chorobę zakaźną w liczbie wyraźnie większej niż we wcześniejszym okresie albo wystąpienie zakażeń lub chorób zakaźnych dotychczas niewystępujących. O ile w okresie od 14 marca do dnia 19 marca 2020 roku, a więc w czasie oficjalnego ogłoszenia stanu zagrożenia epidemicznego, można byłoby się ewentualnie zastanawiać, czy już mamy do czynienia z epidemią, czy jeszcze „tylko” z ryzykiem jej wystąpienia, o tyle oficjalne ogłoszenie stanu epidemii począwszy od dnia 20 marca 2020 roku rozwiewa w tym zakresie wszelkie wątpliwości. Stan epidemii wywołuje szereg daleko idących, bezpośrednich konsekwencji prawnych, lecz równocześnie w istotny sposób wzmacnia legitymację do powołania się na zawartą w umowie klauzulę siły wyższej.
  • Inne przypadki siły wyższej. Sytuacja jest jednak bardziej złożona, rozprzestrzenianie się COVID-19 uruchomiło szereg reakcji i procesów, których kierunek rozwoju, a przede wszystkim skutki trudno na obecnym etapie przewidzieć. Wiele z nich może być potencjalnie postrzeganych w kategoriach siły wyższej, co można odnieść także do działań organów administracji publicznej i podjętych już czynności mających w celu zwalczani zagrożenia epidemicznego. Chodzi tu przede wszystkim o rozporządzenie Ministra Zdrowia z dnia 20 marca 2020 roku w sprawie ogłoszenia na obszarze Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej stanu epidemii. Rozporządzenie to wprowadza szereg restrykcji bardzo bezpośrednio przekładających się na prowadzenie działalności gospodarczej, w tym m.in. ograniczenie lub całkowity zakaz prowadzenia określonych rodzajów działalności (w tym organizowania imprez, działalności związanej z konsumpcją i podawaniem napojów, handlu detalicznego określonymi towarami w dużych obiektach handlowych czy też działalności związanej ze sportem, rozrywkowej i rekreacyjnej), ograniczenia określonego sposobu przemieszczania się (np. wstrzymanie przemieszczania się pasażerów w transporcie kolejowym, wprowadzenie obowiązku kwarantanny dla osób przekraczających polską granicę) czy też ograniczenia lub zakaz obrotu i używania określonych przedmiotów (np. zakaz wywozu lub zbywania poza terytorium RP respiratorów oraz kardiomonitorów). Postrzeganie działalności władczej państwa (tzw. imperium) w kategoriach siły wyższej budzi co prawda pewne kontrowersje w literaturze prawniczej, tym niemniej uznać należy, że swoboda stron w kształtowaniu relacji umownej sięga na tyle daleko, aby tego rodzaju urzędowe obostrzenia mogły zostać objęte ustaloną przez strony definicją siły wyższej. Decydujące znaczenie w tym zakresie będzie więc miała treść umowy.
  • Co, jeśli w umowie nie została przewidziana klauzula siły wyższej? Podobny problem może się pojawić również wtedy, gdy co prawda strony takie postanowienie przewidziały w umowie, aczkolwiek z uwagi na jego wąski zakres nie będzie ono mogło zostać zastosowane, np. gdy jego treść została zredukowana wyłącznie do wyczerpującego wyliczenia określonych sytuacji, które akurat nie obejmują ani epidemii ani działań władczych państwa. Siła wyższa jest pojęciem używanym na gruncie polskiego prawa, nie ma jednakże ogólnego przepisu w Kodeksie cywilnym, który przewidywałby ograniczenie odpowiedzialności umownej z uwagi na działanie siły wyższej. W takiej sytuacji należałoby się zastanowić nad alternatywnymi instrumentami, w tym w pierwszym rzędzie nad tzw. klauzulą rebus sic stantibus z art. 3571 Kodeksu cywilnego, która jakiś czas temu przeżyła prawdziwy renesans popularności w związku z publiczną dyskusją w kwestii możliwości jej zastosowania do kredytów denominowanych oraz indeksowanych frankiem szwajcarskim (CHF). Przepis ten pozwala na zmianę sposobu wykonania świadczenia, jego wysokości lub nawet rozwiązanie umowy, jeśli spełnienie świadczenia byłoby połączone z nadmiernymi trudnościami albo groziłoby jednej ze stron rażącą stratą z powodu nadzwyczajnej zmiany stosunków, czego strony nie przewidywały przy zawarciu umowy. Podobne mechanizmy zostały przez ustawodawcę przewidziane dla niektórych konkretnych rodzajów umów (np. podwyższenie wynagrodzenia ryczałtowego lub rozwiązanie umów o dzieło zgodnie z art. 632 Kodeksu cywilnego, czy obniżenie czynszu dzierżawnego na podstawie art. 700 Kodeksu cywilnego). Warto w tym kontekście pamiętać także o tym, że odpowiedzialność za należyte wykonanie opiera się na zasadzie winy, przy czym dłużnik jest co do zasady zobowiązany do dochowania należytej staranności. Atrakcyjność wskazanych wyżej rozwiązań istotnie obniża jednak fakt, że o zmianie stosunku umownego (lub nawet jego rozwiązaniu) orzeka sąd, co oznacza, że efektywne rozwiązanie problemu niemożności wykonania umowy odwlecze się w czasie, w szczególności mając na uwadze obecną sytuację. Już teraz, o ile problem nie zostanie uprzednio uregulowany systemowo przez ustawodawcę, należy liczyć się z nadzwyczajnymi opóźnieniami w pracy sądów.
  • Jakie działania podjąć w chwili obecnej? Zazwyczaj postanowienia umowne regulujące siłę wyższą przewidują też odpowiednią procedurę działania, której początkiem jest powiadomienie drugiej strony, że jej kontrahent handlowy został dotknięty przypadkiem siły wyższej i że może to wpłynąć na wykonywanie przez niego obowiązków umownych. Należy to zrobić zgodnie z przewidzianym umową trybem komunikacji, w każdym jednakże razie w sposób, który odpowiednio udokumentuje spełnienie tego obowiązku informacyjnego. Kolejnym etapem może być podjęcie przez strony, w dobrej wierze, negocjacji w celu odpowiedniej zmiany stosunku umownego. Ostatecznie w razie przedłużającego się działania siły wyższej (np. dłużej niż 90 dni), każdej ze stron może przysługiwać prawo do jednostronnego rozwiązania umowy. Wiele zależy od okoliczności konkretnej sprawy (w tym przede wszystkim od brzmienia umowy) wydaje się jednak, że w obecnej chwili jest jeszcze za wcześnie na wyciąganie daleko idących wniosków i przede wszystkim należałoby poczekać na dalszy rozwój sytuacji. Bez wątpienia podjęcie komunikacji z kontrahentem handlowym i przygotowanie go na ewentualne perturbacje w zakresie wykonania umowy jest jak najbardziej wskazane. Co istotne, dotyczy to zarówno umów, w których siła wyższa została wyraźnie uregulowana, jak i tych, w których brak jest tego typu regulacji. Rozpoczęcie rozmów na wczesnym etapie działania siły wyższej może ograniczyć rozmiar ewentualnych szkód, a być może także zwiększyć szansę na utrzymanie relacji kontraktowej.
Call To Action Arrow Image

Newsletter-Anmeldung

Wählen Sie aus unserem Angebot Ihre Interessen aus!

Jetzt abonnieren
Jetzt abonnieren