Author
Vera Jurgens

Vera Jurgens

Counsel

Read More
Author
Vera Jurgens

Vera Jurgens

Counsel

Read More

19 January 2022

Crowdfunding, access to finance for SMEs

  • Briefing

Financing is the lubricant of the economy. Access to financing options must be well regulated, for all companies, large and small. The growth of lending to businesses has slowed down in recent years. At the same time, many parties have entered the market for business financing alongside regular banks. It is important that both sectors are given room in their regulations as well as supervision so that they can serve the business community.”

Vera Jurgens | Counsel Disputes & Investigations Taylor Wessing

Apparently, the government also believes that access to financing for SMEs must be guaranteed, since the report MKB-financiering in Nederland of BDO Corporate Finance B.V. was published on 23 February 2021. The report is the result of a motion that was submitted in the Dutch Lower House, requesting an investigation into the collateral practice in SME financing. According to BDO, the key question to be answered in the report is: "To what extent does the practice of providing security in the Netherlands affect access of SMEs to follow-up financing from both bank and non-bank financiers (in the segment of financing up to € 1 million)?” A justified question, as current financing practice is that banks often insure their positions to the maximum and claim a monopoly on all conceivable collateral securities. One of the conclusions of the report is that, in author’s opinion, the practice of collateralisation does not affect access of SMEs to follow-up financing in many cases. However, the report states that if it does have an impact, in a relatively large number of cases it will prove to be a significant obstacle. 

With the Disputes & Investigations team, we assist both banks and alternative financiers. In a number of cases, the problems described above also played a role. Although an SME almost always turns to its house bank first, the bank is not always prepared to provide additional or follow-up financing, for several reasons. While a follow-up loan may not be justified, a common complaint is that somewhat smaller SMEs in particular find it more difficult to access finance. Possibly banks, due to the relatively high (handling) costs and limited revenues, do not consider these loans profitable enough. In any case, crowdfunding platforms seem to respond to the situation and present themselves as alternative financiers where SMEs can get fast and relatively easy (i.e. online) access to financing. In the absence of collateral, such alternative financiers have to make do with personal collateral, such as a guarantee. In addition, the higher risk, partly due to the limited collateral, is discounted in the price, viz. a higher interest rate. 

Surety

Surety is an agreement whereby one party (the guarantor) undertakes towards the other party (the creditor) to fulfil an obligation of a third party (the principal debtor). It is a special form of joint and several liability. Through the surety, the creditor obtains an additional (albeit subsidiary) counterparty who must perform the same as the principal debtor. In other words: 2 for the price of 1. By definition, the obligation of the surety is dependent on the obligation of the principal debtor. Without that (principal) obligation, no surety. 

Consent requirement

However, where personal securities are provided, the consent requirement of Article 1:88 of the Dutch Civil Code should always be taken into consideration. This Article (briefly put) obliges a spouse to give the other spouse his or her consent to perform certain legal acts, such as the surety. In the absence of the required consent, the legal act is voidable (Article 1:88 in conjunction with Article 1:89 of the DCC). The underlying rationale is that spouses, in the interest of the family, must be protected from each other in case of legal acts that carry a substantial  financial risk. An exception to this still powerful main rule is that no permission is required for a commercial guarantee, if this relates to a legal act that takes place in the normal course of the company's business. Although, from the point of view of  'prevention is better than cure', suretyships are usually co-signed by the spouse of the guarantor, things still sometimes go wrong, as is evidenced by numerous case law examples concerning Article 1:88 of the Dutch Civil Code.

Court ruling

In the court ruling discussed below, Article 1:88 of the Dutch Civil Code plays a role in the case of financing by means of crowdfunding and the core issue is: Is taking out a loan via a crowdfunding platform a legal act that is performed in the ordinary course of a company's business?

The starting point is that, barring special circumstances, a financing agreement is part of the normal business operations of a company. However, some caution is appropriate when it concerns financing that has been realised through a crowdfunding platform. 

The case

Mr X is the sole (indirect) managing director of a company. This company approached its house bank to extend the current bank credit, but the bank refused. X therefore turns to a crowdfunding platform. The crowdfunding platform, or at least the underlying private investors, are prepared to provide a loan. When, after approximately 1.5 years, the company goes bankrupt, the crowdfunding platform calls Mr X to account for his obligations as guarantor. Mr X refuses to pay and the crowdfunding platform therefore institutes court proceedings. The claims are dismissed, however, and the Court of Appeal also rules against the crowdfunding platform, because the guarantee issued by Mr X was not co-signed by his spouse. In other words: in the absence of the spouse’s consent, she was authorised to nullify the surety, which she did. The crowdfunding platform took the position that her consent was not required. After all, it concerned a collateral security that was issued for the fulfilment of the company's obligations with respect to a loan. So why were the claims rejected in two instances? 

Is crowdfunding a 'normal' form of financing?

Mr X was of the opinion that the loan could not be regarded 'normal financing', as not only should the purpose for which the financing is provided be considered, but also the person or entity providing the financing and the form in which this is done. According to Mr X, a loan obtained through crowdfunding is not a 'normal' way of financing. Unlike Mr X, the crowdfunding platform argued that the question who provided the financing is irrelevant. What matters is the content of the agreement, the conditions under which the financing was provided. The circumstance that a crowdfunding platform provides financing in addition to the existing forms of financing does not, of course, say anything about the question how such financing should be qualified. It is true that crowdfunding in general is a relatively new form of financing, next to existing financing possibilities, such as a bank loan, supplier credit or factoring. This does not make the loan, which was raised via crowdfunding, special or a legal act that therefore falls outside the scope of normal business operations. This applies all the more if the loan is indeed nothing more or less than a perfectly normal loan. The court described the loan as 'an additional credit in addition to a regular bank credit' and 'incidental financing', but did not express an opinion in so many words on the question whether the method of financing (crowdfunding) was of (decisive) importance in the assessment of the question whether or not the loan was a legal act that takes place in the normal course of business. Incidentally, the court ultimately held that this was not the case, but it based this on other circumstances. The crowdfunding platform was not aware of these circumstances at the time the loan was arranged and therefore lodged an appeal against the district court's ruling. However, the crowdfunding platform did not find the Court of Appeal on its side, because the Court of Appeal was also of the opinion that the loan cannot be regarded as a legal act in the normal course of the company's business. The Court of Appeal considered the following, among other things: 

"It is also important that essential credit terms such as the interest rate with [crowdfunding platform] and the commission were more disadvantageous for the company than would have been the case with [house bank], while the form of financing (crowdfunding) and the fact that no in-depth investigation is carried out into the financial position of the applicants for the credit can be regarded as special features - in comparison with a regular bank credit. " 

The Court of Appeal considers the form of financing (crowdfunding) as a special feature and has, in addition to all other circumstances of the case, taken this into account in the (final) opinion that the loan cannot be regarded as a legal act in the normal course of the company's business. 

Information 

Another issue that should be discussed is the opinion of the court concerning 'the fact that no in-depth investigation is conducted'. This consideration (although not substantively correct) was probably prompted by the circumstance that crowdfunding platforms often operate online and advertise a faster and more efficient assessment of the financing application. Possibly this consideration was also fuelled by the reproach that the crowdfunding platform subsequently made to Mr X. According to the crowdfunding platform, at the time of the application for the loan, Mr X had sketched an exclusively positive story. He had stated that the company needed additional funds to finance its working capital. This need for credit had arisen because of the growth in turnover and the quicker start-up of new projects. Precisely because of this growth, Mr X expected to be able to repay the loan within three years. It was not until in the course of the proceedings that Mr X shared further information about the financial position of the company, which showed that the company had been in a bad financial position and the loan would in fact have to be considered a bridging loan. This had not been communicated by Mr X to the crowdfunding platform earlier and did not appear from the financial documentation that had been made available either. The Court of Appeal also ignored this and held: 

"that the circumstance that [crowdfunding platform] - as it claims - did not (possibly) possess all relevant information regarding the financial position of the company at the time the loan agreement was entered into is of no significance in this respect. After all, it may be expected from [crowdfunding platform] as a professional lender that it was aware of the possibility that the consent of the other spouse was required."

In short: Mr X’s positive statements did not help the crowdfunding platform. The starting point is that the exception to the requirement of consent must be interpreted restrictively and that carries considerable weight. 


Crowdfunding, toegang MKB tot financiering

Financiering is de smeerolie van de economie. De toegang tot financiering moet goed geregeld zijn, voor alle ondernemingen groot en klein. De groei van kredietverlening aan het bedrijfsleven is de laatste jaren vertraagd. Tegelijkertijd zijn er naast het bancaire aanbod veel partijen op de markt voor bedrijfsfinanciering actief geworden. Voor beide domeinen is het van belang dat in regelgeving en toezicht ruimte wordt gegeven zodat zij het bedrijfsleven kunnen bedienen.”

Vera Jurgens | Counsel Disputes & Investigations Taylor Wessing

Kennelijk is ook de overheid van mening dat toegang tot financiering voor het MKB moet zijn gewaarborgd, want op 23 februari 2021 werd het rapport MKB-financiering in Nederland van BDO Corporate Finance B.V. gepubliceerd. Het rapport is een uitvloeisel van een motie die in de Tweede Kamer is ingediend, waarin is verzocht om een onderzoek naar de zekerhedenpraktijk bij MKB financiering. Aldus BDO luidt de kernvraag, waarop zij in het rapport antwoord wil geven: “In hoeverre is de zekerhedenpraktijk in Nederland van invloed op de toegang van het MKB tot vervolgfinanciering, bij zowel bancaire als non-bancaire financiers (in het segment van financiering tot € 1 miljoen)?” Een terechte vraag, omdat in de huidige financieringspraktijk banken hun posities veelal maximaal verzekeren en het alleenrecht claimen op alle denkbare, zakelijke zekerheden. Een van de conclusies uit het rapport luidt dat de zekerhedenpraktijk in de optiek van de onderzoeker niet in veel gevallen van invloed is op de toegang van het MKB tot vervolgfinanciering. Echter, zo luidt het rapport, als zij van invloed is dan is zij in betrekkelijk veel gevallen van wezenlijk belemmerende invloed. 

We staan met het team Disputes & Investigations  zowel banken als alternatieve financiers bij. In een aantal gevallen speelde de hierboven staande problematiek ook. Hoewel een MKB-er zich vrijwel eerst tot de huisbank wendt, is die huisbank niet steeds bereid tot een additionele of vervolgfinanciering. Daar kunnen meerdere redenen aan ten grondslag liggen. Wellicht is een vervolgfinanciering niet verantwoord, maar een veel gehoorde klacht is dat met name de wat kleinere MKB-bedrijven moeilijker toegang hebben tot financiering. Mogelijk zien banken, vanwege de relatief hoge (handling)kosten en beperkte opbrengsten, er weinig brood in. Hoe dan ook, crowdfundplatformen lijken hierop in te spelen en presenteren zich als alternatieve financiers waar het MKB snel en betrekkelijk eenvoudig (want online) toegang krijgt tot financiering. Bij gebreke van zakelijke zekerheden moeten dergelijke alternatieve financiers wel genoegen nemen met persoonlijke zekerheden, zoals bijvoorbeeld de borgtocht. Daarnaast wordt het hogere risico, mede vanwege de geringe zekerheden, verdisconteerd in de prijs; een hoger rentetarief. 

Borgtocht

De borgtocht is een overeenkomst, waarbij de ene partij (de borg) zich tegenover de andere partij (de schuldeiser) verbindt tot nakoming van een verbintenis, van een derde (de hoofdschuldenaar). Het betreft een bijzondere vorm van hoofdelijkheid. Door middel van de borgtocht verkrijgt de schuldeiser immers een extra (zij het subsidiaire) wederpartij die hetzelfde moet presteren als de hoofdschuldenaar. Oftewel: 2 voor de prijs van 1. Naar haar aard is de verbintenis van de borg afhankelijk van de verbintenis van de hoofdschuldenaar. Zonder die (hoofd)verbintenis, geen borgtocht. 

Toestemmingsvereiste

Maar waar persoonlijke zekerheden worden verstrekt, moet men ook bedacht zijn op het toestemmingsvereiste van art. 1:88 BW. Dit artikel verplicht een echtgenoot (kort gezegd) om de andere echtgenoot zijn of haar toestemming voor bepaalde rechtshandelingen, zoals de borgtocht. Bij gebreke van de vereiste toestemming is de rechtshandeling vernietigbaar (art. 1:88 BW jo 1:89 BW). De ratio hierachter is dat echtgenoten in het belang van het gezin tegen elkaar beschermd moeten worden bij rechtshandelingen met een groot financieel risico. Uitzondering op deze nog steeds krachtige hoofdregel is dat geen toestemming vereist is voor een zakelijke borgtocht, als deze ziet op een rechtshandeling die geschiedt in de normale uitoefening van het bedrijf van die vennootschap. Hoewel uit het oogpunt van ‘voorkomen is beter dan genezen’, borgtochten in de regel worden medeondertekend door echtgeno(o)t(e) van de borg, gaat het nog steeds wel eens mis. De jurisprudentie op het gebied van art. 1:88 BW is meer dan talrijk te noemen. 

Arrest

In dit arrest speelt 1:88 BW, in geval van financieren door middel van crowdfunding en staat de vraag centraal: Is het aangaan van een geldlening via een crowdfundplatform een rechtshandeling die geschiedt in de normale uitoefening van het bedrijf van een vennootschap?

Uitgangspunt is dat een financieringsovereenkomst, behoudens bijzondere omstandigheden, tot de normale bedrijfsuitoefening van een vennootschap behoort. Enige oplettendheid past echter wanneer het gaat om een financiering die via een crowdfundplatform tot stand is gekomen. 

De casus

De heer X is enig (middellijk) bestuurder van een vennootschap. Deze vennootschap heeft haar huisbank benaderd om het lopende bankkrediet uit te breiden, maar de bank weigert. Om die reden wendt X zich tot een crowdfundplatform. Het crowdfundplatform, althans de achterliggende particuliere investeerders, is (zijn) wel bereid om een geldlening te verstrekken. Als na ongeveer 1,5 jaar de vennootschap failliet gaat, spreekt het crowdfundplatform de heer X aan op zijn verplichtingen als borg. De heer X weigert tot betaling over te gaan, zodat het crowdfundplatform een procedure start bij de rechtbank. De vorderingen worden echter afgewezen en ook bij het gerechtshof vangt het crowdfundplatform bot. De reden hiervan is dat de door de heer X afgegeven borgtocht niet was medeondertekend door zijn echtgenote. In andere woorden: bij gebreke van de toestemming van de betreffende echtgenote, was zij bevoegd de borgtocht te vernietigen, hetgeen zij ook heeft gedaan. Het crowdfundplatform stelde zich op het standpunt dat haar toestemming niet vereist was. Het betrof immers een zakelijke borg die was afgegeven tot zekerheid voor de nakoming van de vennootschap van haar verplichtingen uit een geldlening. Waarom werden de vorderingen dan toch in twee instanties afgewezen? 

Is crowdfunding een ‘normale’ vorm van financiering?

De heer X vond dat de geldlening niet als een ‘normale financiering’ kon worden aangemerkt, omdat niet alleen gekeken moet worden naar het doel waarvoor de financiering wordt verstrekt, maar ook naar de persoon of entiteit die de financiering verstrekt en de vorm waarin dat gebeurt. Volgens de heer X is een geldlening die is verkregen via crowdfunding geen ‘normale’ wijze van financieren. Anders dan de heer X, betoogde het crowdfundplatform dat de vraag wie de financiering heeft verstrekt niet ter zake doet. Het gaat om de inhoud van de overeenkomst, de voorwaarden waaronder de financiering is versterkt. De omstandigheid dat een crowdfundplatform financieringen verstrekt in aanvulling op de bestaande financieringsvormen, zegt natuurlijk niets over de vraag hoe een dergelijke financiering gekwalificeerd moet worden. Het is juist dat crowdfunding in het algemeen een relatief nieuwe vorm van financieren is, naast bestaande financieringsmogelijkheden, zoals een bancair krediet, leverancierskrediet of factoring. Dit maakt de geldlening, die via crowdfunding tot stand is gekomen, niet bijzonder, noch een rechtshandeling die daarom buiten het kader van de normale bedrijfsuitoefening valt. Dit geldt eens te meer als de geldlening inderdaad niets meer of minder is dan een doodnormale geldlening. De rechtbank omschreef de geldlening als ‘een additioneel krediet ter aanvulling van een regulier bankkrediet’ en ‘een incidentele financiering’, maar liet zich niet met zoveel woorden uit over de vraag of de wijze van financiering (crowdfunding) van (doorslaggevend) belang was bij de beoordeling van de vraag of de geldlening nu wel of niet een rechtshandeling was die geschiedt in de normale bedrijfsuitoefening. Overigens luidde het oordeel van de rechtbank uiteindelijk dat zulks niet het geval was, maar dat baseerde zij op andere omstandigheden. Met deze omstandigheden was het crowdfundplatform bij de totstandkoming van de geldlening niet bekend, zodat zij in hoger beroep is gegaan tegen de uitspraak van de rechtbank. Het crowdfundplatform vindt echter het gerechtshof niet aan haar zijde, omdat ook het gerechtshof van oordeel is dat de geldlening niet kan worden aangemerkt als een rechtshandeling in de normale uitoefening van het bedrijf van de vennootschap. Het gerechtshof overweegt onder meer als volgt: 

“Voorts is van belang dat belangrijke kredietvoorwaarden zoals het rentepercentage bij [crowdfundplatform] en de provisie voor de vennootschap nadeliger waren dan bij [huisbank] het geval zou zijn geweest, terwijl ook de vorm van financiering (crowdfunding) en het feit dat geen diepgaand onderzoek wordt verricht naar de financiële positie van de aanvragen van het krediet als bijzondere kenmerken – in vergelijking met een regulier bankkrediet – zijn aan te merken.” 

Het hof ziet de vorm van financiering (crowdfunding) als een bijzonder kenmerk en heeft dat, naast alle overige omstandigheden van het geval, meegewogen in het (uiteindelijke) oordeel dat de geldlening niet kan worden aangemerkt als een rechtshandeling in de normale uitoefening van het bedrijf van de vennootschap. 

Informatie

Een ander punt van aandacht is de overweging van het hof over ‘het feit dat geen diepgaand onderzoek wordt verricht’. Deze overweging (hoewel inhoudelijk niet juist) is vermoedelijk ingegeven door de omstandigheid dat crowdfundplatformen veelal online opereren en adverteren met een snellere en efficiëntere beoordeling van de financieringsaanvraag. Mogelijk werd deze overweging ook gevoed door het volgende verwijt dat het crowdfundplatform de heer X maakte. Aldus het crowdfundplatform had de heer X ten tijde van de aanvraag voor de geldlening, een uitsluitend positief verhaal geschetst. Hij had verklaard dat de vennootschap additioneel geld nodig had ter financiering van het werkkapitaal. Deze kredietbehoefte zou zijn ontstaan door groei in omzet en het sneller kunnen opstarten van nieuwe projecten. Juist vanwege deze groei verwachtte de heer X naar eigen zeggen de lening binnen de looptijd van 3 jaar te kunnen terugbetalen. De heer X deelde pas in de procedure nadere informatie over de financiële positie van de vennootschap, waaruit bleek dat de vennootschap in een slechte financiële positie zou hebben verkeerd en dat de geldlening in feite moest worden aangemerkt als een overbruggingskrediet. Dit had de heer X niet eerder aan het crowdfundplatform medegedeeld en bleek ook niet uit de ter beschikking gestelde financiële documentatie. Het hof gaat ook hieraan voorbij en overweegt: 

“dat de omstandigheid dat [crowdfundplatform] – zoals zij stelt – ten tijde van het aangaan van de geldleningsovereenkomst (mogelijk) niet beschikte over alle relevante informatie aangaande de financiële positie van de vennootschap, hierbij als zodanig geen betekenis toekomt. Van [crowdfundplatform] als professioneel kredietverstrekker mag immers worden verwacht dat zij bedacht was op de mogelijkheid dat toestemming van de andere echtgenoot was vereist.”

Kortom: de positieve uitlatingen van de heer X hielpen het crowdfundplatform niet. Het uitgangspunt is dat de uitzondering op het toestemmingsvereiste restrictief moet worden uitgelegd en dat legt behoorlijk wat gewicht in de schaal. 

Call To Action Arrow Image

Latest insights in your inbox

Subscribe to newsletters on topics relevant to you.

Subscribe
Subscribe

Related Insights

Bank account
Disputes & investigations

Right to a bank account

19 January 2022
Briefing

by Vera Jurgens

Click here to find out more
Inside the Office Building
Disputes & investigations

Change of rank of pledges

19 January 2022
Briefing

by Vera Jurgens

Click here to find out more
Piggy banks on pink background
Disputes & investigations

The effect of the Wwft on banking relationships (part II)

19 January 2022
Briefing

by Vera Jurgens

Click here to find out more