Authors

Krystian Stanasiuk, LL.M.

Partner

Read More

Marta Janowska

Senior associate

Read More

Michal Zabost

Associate

Read More
Authors

Krystian Stanasiuk, LL.M.

Partner

Read More

Marta Janowska

Senior associate

Read More

Michal Zabost

Associate

Read More

8 November 2021

Whistleblower - Disruptive informant or law enforcement officer?

  • In-depth analysis

This article is also available in Polish

In connection with the December deadline to implement Directive (EU) 2019/1937 of the European Parliament and of the Council dated 23 October 2019 on the protection of individuals who report breaches of Union law (the "Directive"), we would like to provide you with the most relevant points related to this issue. 

Although on 18 October a draft of the Polish act on the protection of persons reporting breaches of the law was published, which specifies the details of how the Directive will be implemented into the Polish legal system, we published its assumptions here, in this article we focus on the position of the whistleblower and its common perception.

Who exactly is a whistleblower?

A whistleblower is a person who makes a report who has obtained information on violations in the context of work or services provided. A whistleblower can be an employee (as well as a former or potential employee), co-worker/contractor, subcontractor, supplier, client, trainee, or even a volunteer. Thus, a whistleblower may be anyone who has access to information on the functioning of an organisation, notices any irregularity and informs on it in a manner adopted in a given organisation, through separately established channels.

Are whistleblowers worth fearing? 

Absolutely not! A whistleblower is a person who, in principle, should act in the common interest of the entire organisation. They report irregularities, the existence of which very often is not known to decision-makers. The report is aimed at investigating and eliminating, still on the internal level, unethical or even illegal activities. In Poland, a whistleblower may still be associated with an informant, because grassroots reporting of irregularities which occur very often at the lower levels of an organisation can be associated with times long gone by many people. 

…or maybe is it the whistleblowers who are full of fear?

Before a given person reports a noticed irregularity, they are undoubtedly also afraid of possible repression from superiors or colleagues, because the behaviour of a whistleblower may be very badly perceived by those around him or her. This may project on further functioning or the perception of such a person in the organisation. A whistleblower may simply fear rejection, gossip or any form of discrimination - these are natural psychological mechanisms. This is why it is so important to implement a legal and organisational framework for whistleblowers holistically, including providing training or information campaigns which even encourage them to share their legitimate observations about functioning of an organization.

Whistleblower ≠ informant

When debunking the quite common myth of the whistleblower = “informant”, it is important to emphasise the differences between a typical informant and a statutory whistleblower. An informant acts solely in their particular interest in order to obtain personal benefits, very often motivated by personal motives which result from interpersonal conflicts or their own failures and reports are in the vast majority made in bad faith. A whistleblower, on the other hand, is someone who by definition, acting in good faith, reports constructive and possibly proven (or plausible) information about irregularities in the functioning of a given organisation. A whistleblower is not guided by a particular interest, but takes into account and cares about the interest of the entire organisation or the public interest and therefore deserves to be statutorily protected against potential unwanted actions.

Are whistleblowing channels a new institution? How does it work in the world?

The whistleblowing mechanism is not a novelty, because it has been operating successfully for many years both in EU countries (Hungary, Slovenia, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Malta or Slovakia) and outside the EU (the United Kingdom, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, Japan or distant Ghana).  Undoubtedly, through the Directive, the EU legislator wants to unify the legal situation of whistleblowers within the entire community and encourage to create a framework for reporting irregularities within organisations.  As international statistics show, whistleblowing is still one of the most effective methods of detecting irregularities, which allows to effectively eliminate the problem at source. 

According to the Association of Certified Investigators, the Report to the Nations (available here) indicates that as many as 43% of cases are detected through established whistleblowing channels, with 50% of those cases being reported by employees themselves, and 33% of whistleblowing cases occur through a separate infoline or email address established for that purpose. This is still the overwhelming percentage of cases detected thanks to whistleblower reports as compared to other sources of information about irregularities. This undoubtedly translates into the possibility to eliminate the problem internally, to protect the reputation of the organisation and to increase the sense of loyalty and empowerment of employees and colleagues.

How is whistleblowing developing in Poland? 

In Poland, the organisational and legal framework for whistleblowing is still in its infancy. The social and historical background means that it will be a challenge not so much organisational and legal, but more sociological and psychological. Time will tell whether the implementation of the Directive will translate into real effectiveness of the whistleblowing process in Poland and whether it will be beneficial to both employees and entire organisations.
So far, a formalised whistleblowing system has not been common practice in Poland. However, some organisations have decided to introduce such solutions for a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, this only represents a small percentage of enterprises and the practice of signalling potential violations is marginal.
It is not clear, however, whether this is a question of historical background, the lack of a statutory framework defining the path of action in the case of reporting irregularities, or the unwillingness of potential whistleblowers to report irregularities which occur to them. We hope that the implementation of the Directive will change something in this regard. However, this will not be possible without the appropriate training or information campaigns to encourage reporting. One should consider that the fulfilment of legal obligations alone will be insufficient if whistleblowing channels are at a dead end. 

Why are Poles afraid of whistleblowing? 

It seems that this is due to demonizing the character of the whistleblower, which is often mistaken for the notion of an informant and the willingness to report an irregularity is associated with possible repercussions for the whistleblower, whether from superiors or colleagues. 

Interesting information in this respect is provided by the Batory Foundation Report prepared as part of the Forum of Idea "Oppressed, Admired and ... Deserving Protection. Poles about whistleblowers." from 2019 (available here). The survey shows that Polish people are unable to define what it is to act in the public interest (in the sense of the interest of the state or a community such as a work environment). For this reason, they are inclined to turn a blind eye to noticed abuse or neglect in workplaces. However, the main deterrent to reporting, whether internally or externally (to the media or to the relevant authorities), is the fear of being ostracised by those around them and of being seen as an informant. 

A whistleblower-friendly organisational culture is one which does not create barriers to openly communicate observed problems to superiors. Unless an appropriate information campaign is conducted and a culture of acceptance for whistleblowers is built in the workplace, whistleblowers will be subjected to potential harassment from those around them or they will not use the opportunity to report at all. The crucial role here is the role of employers or direct superiors who, while introducing channels for whistleblowing in their organisations, should not forget about the psychological aspect of reporting and the "zero tolerance" policy for stigmatizing whistleblowers.

Current legal regulations concerning whistleblowing

The Polish legal system already contains certain provisions which provide a framework of protection for whistleblowers. Pursuant to the Act on Combating Unfair Competition, the disclosure, use or obtaining information which constitutes a trade secret does not constitute an act of unfair competition, provided that it was done in order to disclose irregularities, misconduct or actions in breach of the law for the protection of public interest. Very often organisations, in order to eliminate potentially occurring irregularities and ensure appropriate protection of individuals who make reports, have established their own internal organisational and legal framework. The implementation of the Directive will undoubtedly make it necessary to revise them and adjust to the new statutory regulations. 

The recently published draft bill which implements the Directive will answer these questions. Time will tell if the bill in the draft wording will go through the entire legislative path and what possible changes may be proposed by the legislator. We hope to be clear in the coming weeks. We will continue to keep you informed about further legislative progress on the act on the protection of people who report violations of law. 

We will monitor the progress of work on implementing the Act and provide assistance and support in fulfilling obligations with respect to the implementation of all actions to which entrepreneurs and other entities will be obliged.

We encourage you to read our previous articles in the whistleblower series, which can be found here and here.


Sygnalista. Uciążliwy informator czy stróż prawa?

W związku z grudniowym terminem implementacji Dyrektywy Parlamentu Europejskiego i Rady (UE) 2019/1937 z dnia 23 października 2019 r. w sprawie ochrony osób zgłaszających naruszenia prawa Unii („Dyrektywa”) przybliżamy najistotniejsze kwestie związane z tym zagadnieniem.

Wprawdzie 18 października b.r. opublikowano projekt polskiej ustawy o ochronie osób zgłaszających naruszenia prawa, który określa szczegóły, w jaki sposób Dyrektywa zostanie wdrożona do polskiego porządku prawnego, szczegółowe założenia opublikowaliśmy tutaj, to w niniejszym artykule skupiamy się na pozycji sygnalisty i jej powszechnym postrzeganiu.

Kim dokładnie jest sygnalista?

Sygnalista to osoba dokonująca zgłoszenia, która uzyskała informacje na temat naruszeń w kontekście związanym z pracą lub świadczonymi usługami. Sygnalistą może być pracownik (a także były jak i potencjalny pracownik), współpracownik / kontraktor, wykonawca i podwykonawca, dostawca, klient, stażysta czy nawet wolontariusz. Zatem sygnalistą może zostać każdy, kto ma dostęp do informacji o funkcjonowaniu organizacji, odnotuje jakąkolwiek nieprawidłowość i poinformuje o niej w sposób przyjęty w danej organizacji, za pomocą odrębnie ustanowionych do tego kanałów. 

Czy warto obawiać się sygnalistów? 

Absolutnie nie! Sygnalista to osoba, która z zasady powinna działać we wspólnym interesie całej organizacji. Zgłasza występujące nieprawidłowości, o których istnieniu bardzo często osoby decyzyjne nie mają świadomości. Zgłoszenie ma na celu zbadanie i wyeliminowanie, jeszcze na poziomie wewnętrznym, działań nieetycznych czy wręcz niezgodnych z prawem. W Polsce wciąż może pojawiać się skojarzenie sygnalisty z donosicielem, bowiem oddolne informowanie organizacji o nieprawidłowościach występujących bardzo często na jej niższych szczeblach, może przywołać wielu osobom skojarzenie z czasami słusznie minionymi. 

… a może to sygnaliści są pełni obaw?

Zanim dana osoba dokona zgłoszenia zauważonej nieprawidłowości, niewątpliwie jest także pełna obaw o możliwe represje ze strony przełożonych czy współpracowników, bowiem zachowanie sygnalisty może być bardzo źle odbierane przez otoczenie. Może to rzutować na dalsze funkcjonowanie czy postrzeganie takiej osoby w organizacji. Sygnalista  zwyczajnie może obawiać się odrzucenia, plotek czy jakichkolwiek form dyskryminacji – są to naturalne mechanizmy psychologiczne. Dlatego też tak istotne jest holistyczne wdrożenie ram prawno-organizacyjnych dotyczących sygnalistów, w tym przeprowadzenie szkoleń czy kampanii informacyjnych zachęcających wręcz do dzielenia się swoimi uzasadnionymi spostrzeżeniami dotyczącymi funkcjonowania danej organizacji.

Sygnalista ≠ donosiciel

Obalając dość powszechny mit sygnalisty-„donosiciela” należy podkreślić różnice występujące pomiędzy stereotypowym donosicielem a ustawowym sygnalistą. Donosiciel działa wyłącznie we własnym interesie, w celu uzyskania partykularnych  korzyści, bardzo często kierując się osobistymi pobudkami wynikającymi z konfliktów interpersonalnych czy własnych niepowodzeń, a dokonywane zgłoszenia w znakomitej większości dokonywane są w złej wierze. Natomiast sygnalistą jest ktoś, kto z założenia działając w dobrej wierze zgłasza konstruktywne i w miarę możliwości udowodnione (albo uprawdopodobnione) informacje o zauważonych nieprawidłowościach w funkcjonowaniu danej organizacji. Sygnalista nie kieruje się partykularnym interesem, ale bierze pod uwagę i troszczy się  o interes całej organizacji, czy też interes publiczny, dlatego zasługuje na objęcie ustawową ochroną przed potencjalnymi działaniami niepożądanymi. 

Czy kanały zgłaszania nieprawidłowości są nową instytucją? Jak to wygląda na świecie?

Mechanizm zgłaszania nieprawidłowości nie jest swoistym novum, ponieważ z powodzeniem funkcjonuje od wielu lat zarówno w krajach UE (Węgry, Słowenia, Belgia, Holandia, Włochy, Malta czy Słowacja) jak i poza wspólnotą (Wielka Brytania, Nowa Zelandia, RPA, Kanada, Japonia czy odległa Ghana).  Niewątpliwie unijny ustawodawca poprzez Dyrektywę chce ujednolicić sytuację prawną sygnalistów w obrębie całej wspólnoty i zachęcić do stworzenia w organizacji ram do zgłaszania nieprawidłowości.  Jak pokazują bowiem międzynarodowe statystyki, zgłoszenie nieprawidłowości to wciąż jedna z najbardziej efektywnych metod ich wykrywania, co pozwala na skuteczne wyeliminowanie występującego problemu już u źródła. 

Według Stowarzyszenia Certyfikowanych Śledczych w Raporcie dla Narodów (dostępnym tutaj)  wskazano, że aż 43 % spraw jest wykrywanych przy pomocy ustanowionych kanałów zgłoszenia nieprawidłowości, z czego 50% z nich jest zgłaszanych przez samych pracowników, zaś 33% przypadków zgłaszania nieprawidłowości następuje poprzez ustanowioną do tego odrębną infolinię czy adres mailowy. To wciąż przeważający odsetek spraw wykrywanych dzięki zgłoszeniom sygnalistów w stosunku do innych źródeł informacji o nieprawidłowościach. Przekłada się to niewątpliwie na możliwość wewnętrznego wyeliminowania problemu, ochrony reputacji danej organizacji oraz zwiększenia poczucia lojalności i sprawczości pracowników i współpracowników.

Jak zgłaszanie nieprawidłowości kształtuje się w Polsce? 

W Polsce ramy organizacyjno-prawne sygnalizowania nieprawidłowości dopiero się rozwijają. Podłoże społeczno-historyczne sprawia, że będzie to stanowiło wyzwanie nie tyle organizacyjno-prawne, co bardziej socjologiczne czy psychologiczne. Czas pokaże czy wdrożenie Dyrektywy przełoży się na realną efektywność procesu zgłaszania nieprawidłowości w Polsce, czy będzie to korzystne zarówno dla pracowników, jak i całych organizacji.

Dotychczas, w Polsce sformalizowany system zgłaszania nieprawidłowości nie był powszechną praktyką. Jednakże niektóre organizacje decydowały się na wprowadzenie takich rozwiązań z rozmaitych powodów. Niestety stanowi to tylko mały odsetek przedsiębiorstw, a praktyka sygnalizowania potencjalnych naruszeń jest marginalna.

Nie wiadomo jednak, czy jest to kwestia podłoża historycznego, braku ustawowych ram określających ścieżkę działania w przypadku zgłoszenia nieprawidłowości czy też niechęci potencjalnych sygnalistów do zgłaszania organizacjom występujących u nich nieprawidłowości. Liczymy, że wdrożenie Dyrektywy coś w tym przedmiocie zmieni. Jednak nie będzie to możliwe bez przeprowadzenia stosownych szkoleń czy kampanii informacyjnych, zachęcających do dokonywania zgłoszeń. Należy pamiętać, że samo wypełnienie prawnych obowiązków będzie niewystarczające, jeżeli kanały zgłaszania nieprawidłowości będą martwym narzędziem. 

Dlaczego Polacy obawiają się sygnalizowania? 

Wydaje się, że odpowiedzialne za to jest demonizowanie postaci sygnalisty, które często mylone jest z pojęciem donosiciela, a chęć zgłoszenia zauważonej nieprawidłowości wiązane jest z ewentualnymi reperkusjami wobec sygnalisty czy to ze strony przełożonych czy współpracowników. 

Ciekawych informacji w tym aspekcie dostarcza Raport Fundacji Batorego przygotowany w ramach forumIdei „Gnębieni, podziwiani i …zasługujący na ochronę. Polacy o sygnalistach.” z 2019 roku (dostępny tutaj). Sondaż pokazuje, że Polacy nie potrafią określić, czym jest działanie w interesie społecznym (w sensie interesu państwa lub społeczności, jaką jest środowisko pracy). Z tego powodu są skłonni do przymykania oczu na zauważone nadużycia czy zaniedbania w miejscach pracy. Jednakże głównym czynnikiem powstrzymującym przed dokonaniem  zgłoszenia, zarówno wewnętrznie czy zewnętrznie (do mediów czy do właściwych organów), jest obawa przed ostracyzmem otoczenia i uznaniem za donosiciela. 

Kultura organizacyjna przyjazna sygnalistom to taka, która nie tworzy barier przed otwartym komunikowaniem przełożonym zaobserwowanych problemów. Jeśli nie zostanie przeprowadzona odpowiednia kampania informacyjna, a następnie zbudowana kultura akceptacji dla sygnalistów w miejscu pracy, będą oni obiektem potencjalnych szykan ze strony otoczenia albo w ogóle nie będą korzystać z możliwości dokonania zgłoszenia. Kluczowa jest tu rola pracodawców, czy bezpośrednich przełożonych, którzy przy wprowadzaniu kanałów sygnalizowania nieprawidłowości w swoich organizacjach nie powinni zapominać o psychologicznym aspekcie zgłaszania nieprawidłowości i  o polityce „zero tolerancji” dla piętnowania sygnalistów. 

Obowiązujące regulacje prawne dotyczące sygnalizowania nieprawidłowości

W polskim porządku prawnym istnieją już pewne przepisy, które zapewniają swoiste zręby ochrony sygnalistów. Zgodnie z ustawą o zwalczaniu nieuczciwej konkurencji ujawnienie, wykorzystanie lub pozyskanie informacji stanowiących tajemnicę przedsiębiorstwa, nie stanowi czynu nieuczciwej konkurencji, o ile nastąpiło w celu ujawnienia nieprawidłowości, uchybienia czy działania z naruszeniem prawa dla ochrony interesu publicznego. Bardzo często organizacje, celem wyeliminowania potencjalnie występujących nieprawidłowości i zapewnienia odpowiedniej ochrony osób dokonujących zgłoszenia ustanowiły własne, wewnętrzne ramy organizacyjno-prawne. Implementacja Dyrektywy niewątpliwie spowoduje konieczność ich rewizji i dostosowania do nowych, ustawowych regulacji.  

Opublikowany niedawno projekt ustawy implementującej Dyrektywę pozwoli odpowiedzieć na te pytania. Czas pokaże, czy ustawa w projektowanym brzmieniu przejdzie całą ścieżkę legislacyjną i jakie ewentualne zmiany mogą zostać zaproponowane przez ustawodawcę. Liczymy, że w ciągu najbliższych tygodni będziemy mieli jasność. W dalszym ciągu będziemy Państwa informować o dalszych pracach legislacyjnych nad ustawą o ochronie osób zgłaszających naruszenia prawa.

Monitorujemy przebieg prac nad wdrożeniem ustawy i służymy pomocą oraz wsparciem w wypełnieniu obowiązków przy wdrożeniu wszelkich działań, do których przedsiębiorcy i inne podmioty będą zobowiązani. 

Zachęcamy do zapoznania się z naszymi poprzednimi artykułami z cyklu sygnalistów, które można znaleźć tutaj oraz tutaj

Call To Action Arrow Image

Latest insights in your inbox

Subscribe to newsletters on topics relevant to you.

Subscribe
Subscribe

Related Insights

column close up
Corporate crime & compliance

Publication of the draft law on whistleblowers in Poland

Available in Polish

20 October 2021
Briefing

by multiple authors

Click here to find out more
road arrows
Corporate crime & compliance

Assumptions to the draft protection of whistleblowers’ act

Available in Polish

7 October 2021
In-depth analysis

by multiple authors

Click here to find out more
road arrows
Corporate crime & compliance

Who can be a whistleblower?

Available in Polish

3 March 2021
In-depth analysis

by Marta Janowska

Click here to find out more